I just wanted to share this card


#1

…and another angle…

…and it’s has a built in NIC…

Did I mention it’s going for ~50 bucks on Ebay?

I can hear everyone now:
“Wait. What? Why?”

Well…

There’s a good reason…

(I’m not selling this, btw.)
If anyone needs a PCI-X 64-Bit 133MHz SATA II RAID Controller Card:

If I had the money and there were drivers for Win 7 (idk if it there are) I’d be on this like white on rice. My S5000PSL(ROMB) motherboard has 2 of these slots.


#2

Man, I could use this in a old 16-bay I have. Has an old supermicro motherboard with pci-x.

Ditto on the win7 though :frowning:

Here is the software repository for it.

ftp://ftp.areca.com.tw/RaidCards/BIOS_Firmware/OldProducts/ARC1170

https://www.manualslib.com/products/Areca-Arc-1170-3181630.html


#3

Yea… I wouldn’t dig through that ftp site unless the card was “crazier” cheap.


#4

Windows uses a generic driver for most raid cards but most of the time even when not shipped with the device a manufacturer one can be found floating around the net or even in one of those “driver packs” volunteers maintain online. I have a 10 port SATA III card that runs on pcie x2 it had not driver with its retail box nor any indication of one. It was using a generic 2006 Microsoft driver that installed automatically until I searched it on google and found a driver from 2015.i started this behaviour back in 2005 when my SIS6326 PCI graphics card wouldn’t work as dual monitor with my Foxconn’s built in gpu. I found out It would work with a hacked driver. Barring hacked driver in a search its surprising just how much more stability can be had with more efficiency if lucky to find a non generic driver. There are now websites preserving out of manufacture drivers that would not had been thought of I thought windows 10 driver base would be newer than 2006 personally. That Ebay card is sold out now BTW.


#5

lots of older raid cards have capacity per disk limits much like PC Motherboard bios do. Sometimes there are BIOS patches released.